Something Stupendous: The Overthinking Cycle

I’ve been overthinking these posts. Which is exactly why they’ve stopped coming. I’ve started overanalyzing, over planning, over editing, and generally overthinking every word of every post of every single thing that could possibly be overthunk. This paralyzing overthinking has ground my post production to a halt.

This was brought to my realization by discovering that I could still write a post a day (see this blog) if I just turned the old analytical part of the brain off a tad and let the funtastic words fly. My thesis advisor would be brandishing fruit flies at me for saying such a thing. Sorry Doctor Drosophila but Something Stupendouses are less about my editing and statistic prowess and more about feeling it out.

Of course it’s not quite that easy to turn off the overthinking. However, this has become stupendous. Forget the negative connotations associated with overthinking and really start thinking about it.

That’s right. I want you to overthink overthinking.

Because that’s the point where it all gets stupendous. When the circle loops back around to the origin point and internally combusts in on itself. You realize that you’re overthinking. You start thinking about your overthinking. You overthink the overthinking. You then overthink the fact that you’re overthinking the overthinking. Finally there’s just so much overthinking that you stop overthinking entirely because it’s not possible for the human brain to maintain that level of meta-ness.

Maybe I just really wanted a Charizard on my blog…

And being able to write again? That’s stupendous.

Also anything that feedback loops on itself and then combusts in a sea of Charizard level firewheels is stupendous too. Those are enlightenment moments at their best. 

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Something Stupendous: Running With the Microphone

Today I was one of the girls running around handing microphones to everyone who wanted to ask questions in big conference rooms. It was stupendous. Certainly the event itself was great and the fact that people can pose questions is even better, but the ‘mic running’ is the thing that I deem stupendous today.

I’m sure we’ve all experienced that awkward silence, the moment when someone asks for questions and no-one wants to raise their hand. When mic running this feeling of awkwardness has vanished into the night sky, you’re posed to act, determined to never let a question go unheard. Your eyes are ever watching the crowd, trying to catch that hesitant hand in the air and hoping that you won’t miss it and leave someone hanging. A hand goes up and you scoot over, praying that you don’t trip, knowing that the entire room is waiting for you to hurry up and move. You get there, hand over the mic, hoping against hope that you remembered to flick the switch to ‘on’. You try to appear invisible as you stand nearby the questioner, take the mic back, remember to switch it off for fear of everyone hearing you breath.

You fade back into the background until the question is answered and the silence starts all over again.

The whole experience is stupendous. For starters it keeps you engaged in the conversation before you, it makes you feel important (I’ve got the mic, I control the questions) and best of all, there’s a weird feeling of both adrenaline and connection.

The five second rush to get the mic to the correct person is equivalent to a baton-pass sprint and the payoff feels just as good. People appreciate you getting them the microphone, they all quietly thank you, give you a smile. You’ve successfully enabled interaction between employees; you’re ensuring that the issues are heard. Just the fact that we can freely converse with/criticize our government is amazing; the fact that I could facilitate it is stupendous.

Yes, it’s a little thing, but the little things are the most stupendous.

Plus exercise and adrenaline = bonus